mantle


mantle
man|tle1 [ˈmæntl] n
[Date: 800-900; : Old French; Origin: mantel, from Latin mantellum 'cloak']
1.) take on/assume/wear the mantle of sth
formal to accept or have an important duty or job
It is up to Europe to take on the mantle of leadership in environmental issues.
2.) a mantle of snow/darkness etc
literary something such as snow or darkness that covers a surface or area
A mantle of snow lay on the trees.
3.)
a loose piece of outer clothing without sleeves, worn especially in former times
4.)
a cover that is put over the flame of a gas or oil lamp to make it shine more brightly
5.) [singular] technical
the part of the Earth around the central ↑core
mantle 2
mantle2 v [T]
literary to cover the surface of something

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

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  • Mantle — may refer to: Mantle (clothing), a cloak like garment worn mainly by women as fashionable outerwear Mantle, part of the bird anatomy Mantle (climbing), a rock climbing move used to surmount a ledge Mantle, a black and white dog coat colour,… …   Wikipedia

  • Mantle — steht für: Mantle (Klettern), eine besondere Bewegung beim Klettern Mantle ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Doreen Mantle (* 1930), britische Schauspielerin Lee Mantle (1851–1934), US amerikanischer Politiker Mickey Mantle (1931−1995), US …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • mantle — [man′təl] n. [ME mantel < OE mentel & OFr mantel, both < L mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle < ? Celt] 1. a loose, sleeveless cloak or cape: sometimes used figuratively, in allusion to royal robes of state, as a symbol… …   English World dictionary

  • mantle — man tle, n. [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See {Manual}, {Textile}, and cf. {Mandil}, {Mantel} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mantle — Man tle, v. i. 1. To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; said of hawks. Also used figuratively. [1913 Webster] Ne is there hawk which mantleth on her perch. Spenser. [1913 Webster] Or tend his sparhawk mantling in her mew. Bp. Hall.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mantle — ► NOUN 1) a woman s loose sleeveless cloak or shawl. 2) a close covering, such as that of snow. 3) (also gas mantle) a mesh cover fixed round a gas jet to give an incandescent light when heated. 4) an important role or responsibility that passes… …   English terms dictionary

  • Mantle — Man tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mantled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mantling}.] To cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mantle — I index portentous (ominous), prophetic II index enshroud, plant (covertly place), spread …   Law dictionary

  • mantle — /man tl/, n., v., mantled, mantling. n. 1. a loose, sleeveless cloak or cape. 2. something that covers, envelops, or conceals: the mantle of darkness. 3. Geol. the portion of the earth, about 1800 mi. (2900 km) thick, between the crust and the… …   Universalium

  • Mantle — /man tl/, n. 1. Mickey (Charles), 1931 95, U.S. baseball player. 2. (Robert) Burns, 1873 1948, U.S. journalist. * * * That part of the Earth that lies beneath the crust and above the central core. On average, the mantle begins about 22 mi (35 km) …   Universalium

  • mantle — {{11}}mantle (n.) O.E. mentel loose, sleeveless cloak, from L. mantellum cloak (source of It. mantello, O.H.G. mantal, Ger. Mantel, O.N. mötull), perhaps from a Celtic source. Reinforced and altered 12c. by cognate O.Fr. mantel cloak, mantle;… …   Etymology dictionary